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Air Quality

Air quality is a measure of pollution in the surrounding air over a period of time.  There are many different sources of air pollutants, and various weather factors, that can affect our air quality on a daily basis. Some examples of pollution sources include emissions from energy production, vehicle exhaust, solvent fumes, methane from waste, smoke, and organic matter (e.g. pollen). The quality of the air, both indoors and out, can have a significant impact on the health of the UMBC community and that of the surrounding natural environment.

Local Air Quality

People across America regularly breathe unhealthy air that increases their risk of premature death, asthma attacks, and other adverse health impacts. The 2018 Environment Maryland Research & Policy Center and Maryland PIRG Foundation’s report, Trouble in the Air Millions of Americans Breathe Polluted Air, identified Baltimore as one of the ten most populated metro areas in the US with more than 100 days of elevated air pollution in 2016.

In 2016, 73 million Americans experienced more than 100 days of degraded air quality with the potential to harm human health. That is equal to more than three months of the year in which smog and/or particulate pollution was above the level that the EPA has determined presents “little to no risk.” Millions of more people in urban and rural areas experienced less frequent but still damaging levels of air pollution.

Air pollution hangs over downtown Baltimore in this photo from early January 2016.22A winter weather condition, known as an inversion, can trap pollution from cars, industrial activity and other combustion sources close to the ground. The markings on the image show how the pollution lifted during the day as the air warmed up. Credit: Maryland Department of the Environment

Air pollution hangs over downtown Baltimore in this photo from early January 2016. A winter weather condition, known as an inversion, can trap pollution from cars, industrial activity and other combustion
sources close to the ground. The markings on the image show how the pollution lifted during the day as the air warmed up. Credit: Maryland Department of the Environment

UMBC’s Role in Air Quality

At UMBC, scientists, transportation experts, urban planners, and engineers are working on ways to monitor and reduce air pollution both locally and globally. The UMBC Office of Sustainability supports these efforts by providing data on our emissions through the annual greenhouse gas inventory and by hosting a real-time air quality sensor on campus. UMBC is always exploring new strategies, as outlined in the Climate Action Plan, to reduce the university’s emissions and to adapt the campus to the air quality of the greater Baltimore area.

Some strategies include: